Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin
The Pharmaceutical Society of Japan, established in 1880, is one of Japan’s oldest and most distinguished academic societies. The Society currently has around 18,000 members. It publishes three monthly scientific journals. Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin (Chem. Pharm. Bull.) began publication in 1953 as Pharmaceutical Bulletin. It covers chemistry fields in the pharmaceutical and health sciences. Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin (Biol. Pharm. Bull.) began publication in 1978 as the Journal of Pharmacobio-Dynamics. It covers various biological topics in the pharmaceutical and health sciences. A fourth Society journal, the Journal of Health Science, was merged with Biol. Pharm. Bull. in 2012. Yakugaku Zasshi (Japanese for “Pharmaceutical Science Journal”) has the longest history, with publication beginning in 1881. Yakugaku Zasshi is published mostly in Japanese, except for some articles related to clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical education, which are published in English.
The main aim of the Society’s journals is to advance the pharmaceutical sciences with research reports, information exchange, and high-quality discussion. The average review time for articles submitted to the journals is around one month for first decision. The complete texts of all of the Society’s journals can be freely accessed through J-STAGE. The Society’s editorial committee hopes that the content of its journals will be useful to your research, and also invites you to submit your own work to the journals.

Chairman of Committee
Ken-ichi Hosoya
Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama



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9,083 registered articles
(updated on May 28, 2017)
Online ISSN : 1347-5215
Print ISSN : 0918-6158
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Featured article
Volume 40 (2017) Issue 5 Pages 594-597
Cost-Outcome Description of PEG-IFN-α2b+RBV for Hepatitis C: Results Based on the Interferon Database

Economic evaluation of drugs is used in decision-making on medical care and public policy. Recently, real-world data (RWD) have been used in the analysis. In this study, we discuss the risk and benefits of using RWD for economic evaluation. We conducted a cost-outcome description with RWD from a nationwide registry providing information on hepatitis treatment in Japan and estimated the utility of the analysis. We evaluated the cost-outcome description of peginterferon plus ribavirin (PEG-IFN-α2b+RBV) treatment in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. Simulations were based on a Markov model. The cohorts were set using data from the registry and we assumed a societal perspective for the calculation of costs. The dose and drug cost were chosen based on the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Hepatitis C Virus Infection or package inserts. Model details and parameters were as described in previous studies. The simulations were performed for a period of 10 years with no discount rate. We estimated 2.5 million JPY per Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) in 48-week PEG-IFN-α2b+RBV treatment for a period of 10 years. The results of this study are in agreement with previous HCV treatment economic evaluation studies in Japan. We analyzed the statistics of the HCV-infected patients at each disease stage using the data in our registry and calculated the costs. The results of this study more closely reflect a real-world clinical situation compared to the widely used randomized clinical trial method, which estimates clinical trial results and scenarios.

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Economic evaluation has been recently carried out using real-world data instead of clinical trial data. Akutagawa et al. conducted a cost-outcome description based on a nationwide registry providing information on hepatitis treatment in Japan and estimated the utility of the analysis. Specifically, they evaluated the cost-outcome description of a 48-week peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment in patients infected by the hepatitis C virus. Simulations were based on a Markov model. After setting the cohorts using data from the registry, and assuming a societal perspective for the calculation of costs, they estimated 2.5 million JPY per quality-adjusted life years (QALY) for treatments over a 10-year period. They analyzed patients’ statistics at each disease stage using their registry data and calculated the costs. Their results reflect more closely a real-world clinical situation as compared to the widely used clinical trial method.



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